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The Alternatives to Google Finance (Since it’s Shutting Down)

I’m a big believer in long-term investing and taking advantage of compounding returns to build wealth.  While 95% of my investible assets are in long-term positions, as my internet handle implies, however, I’m also a fan of shorter-term swing trading. I find trading to be fun but I’m set on only using a small percentage of my overall portfolio – in other words, my play account.  I consider the markets to be a lifelong educational endeavor, and even with 20 years under my belt, it still feels like I’m only scratching the surface.

Regardless of whether I’m investing for the long-term, or making a short-term trade, I routinely log in to my Google Finance account when the stock market opens at 9:30 am EST during the week.  I use the portfolio feature to see how my accounts (especially trading positions) are doing and to compare my long-term returns against various index benchmarks (a really great feature).  There are some bugs with the interface (like adding positions and sometimes not showing up in the portfolio list), but since I’m heavily integrated with Google products, the pros heavily outweigh the cons.

All was well until October 2017 when users received a message from Google Finance that they were closing down their portfolio functionality (message as circled above).  I was disappointed in the news, but I realize that things change often, especially in the world of technology.  The good news though is that Google Spreadsheets stock quote functionality will remain which is what I use to track my dividend portfolios (here’s how to create a dividend portfolio watchlist with google spreadsheets).

Digesting the news, my thoughts turned to alternative solutions to Google Finance portfolios.  Ideally, free solutions that worked relatively well.  With this search, I came up with two viable free solutions.

1. Morningstar

 

First, I think that Morningstar is missing a huge opportunity by not adding an “import” feature.  It would be great if I could simply export my Google portfolio transactions and import them into my Morningstar account.

However, let’s start with what I like about the Morningstar portfolio (link):

  • News specific to portfolio positions.
  • Creating custom views/tables (lots of options which is a big plus).
  • Performance measuring, including comparing against index.

What needs work:

  • Often, pages will not load (could be specific to my PC) which can be frustrating.

2. Yahoo Finance

Like Morningstar, Yahoo does not have a feature to import portfolios. However, I’ve been told that the Yahoo App allows for importing portfolio transactions, but I have not tried the app yet.

What I like about Yahoo Finance Portfolios (link):

  • Financial history of individual stocks.  While this functionality is more of a Yahoo Finance feature rather than specifically their portfolio, it is extremely useful in checking dividend history and calculating returns manually (if you are into that).
  • Customized views/tables, however, not as elaborate as Morningstar.

What needs work:

  • As mentioned above, it needs more options for custom views.
  • Cannot measure portfolio performance against index benchmarks.
  • Simply not as comprehensive as Morningstar.

 Final Thoughts

In my search for alternatives to Google Finance Portfolios, I came up with two decent free solutions: Morningstar Portfolios and Yahoo Finance Portfolios.   Both have their pros and cons, however, both do not allow importing (I’ve been told Yahoo app allows importing).   As of right now, I’m leaning towards Morningstar to handle my daily watchlist needs as I find the interface more robust with more options.

Let me know what you use to track your portfolio or if you have any additional ideas.

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FT About the author: FT is the founder and editor of Million Dollar Journey (est. 2006). Through various financial strategies outlined on this site, he grew his net worth from $200,000 in 2006 to $1,000,000 by 2014. You can read more about him here.

{ 15 comments… add one }
  • Leo Ly @ isaved5K.com November 27, 2017, 11:35 am

    I know that I am pretty old school as I just use my excel spreadsheet to track both my net worth and portfolio. I take a snapshot of my net worth and portfolio every quarter and annually. I currently have almost ten years of history of my portfolio and my net worth. From time to time, I would go back into my portfolio history and try to reflect and analyze what I did well and what I did poorly.

    The best part of having this history is to be able to learn from my mistakes and try not to repeat the same mistake twice. I would encourage all readers to take snapshots of their finances on a regular interval to ensure that their net worth and self worth are growing consistently.

    • Chris November 28, 2017, 9:45 am

      Agreed and I do the net worth and portfolio update using a few Excel spreadsheets on the 1st of every month. Takes less than 10 minutes and my favourite day of the month (as long as there wasn’t any big correction in the previous 4 weeks). Started this in 2009 when I got serious about building wealth. Net worth up several million since then :) One of the things about taking an honest look at your financial position is you tend to want to eliminate the debt and increase your investing accounts more when you look at those numbers all the time and compare to the past. Has certainly been motivating for me.

      • Leighton November 30, 2017, 12:34 pm

        Hi Chris,
        Wow, up several million since 2009! Would you be willing to share what your portfolio is made up of? Are you strictly a stock investor or do you have other assets such as property and such. Thanks for the info. It’s always nice to get advice from others who have found a strategy that works.

      • FT FT November 30, 2017, 3:56 pm

        Same here Chris, would like to hear more about your story!

  • Joseph November 27, 2017, 1:34 pm

    Try
    TakeStock 2
    http://ravib.com/takestock/2/
    Made by a fellow Canuck.
    Really nice guy, very responsive.
    Very good software.
    I use it for portfolio and holding tracking for my margin and registered accounts.

  • Dion November 27, 2017, 2:10 pm

    I’ve been using Investing.com’s portfolio and watch list functionality since I got fed up with Yahoo Finance. I like the ability to have multiple portfolios (TFSA, RRSP, etc) and multiple watchlists. I can report $ P/L in Canadian dollars even if the security is in American or otherwise. They have some great funtionality built in with TradingView which allows more detailed charting and the ability to view all your holding’s charts on one page. I recommend you check it out.

  • GYM November 27, 2017, 5:38 pm

    That’s so sad! I don’t have a Google Finance account but I use Google Finance to look at my stocks :( My husband is a big fan of using Yahoo Finance, so I’ll probably switch to that.

  • Gurjit Sidhu November 27, 2017, 5:44 pm

    I find Globe Investor portfolios to be pretty good

  • Dash2Retire November 29, 2017, 1:42 pm

    I have used both Morningstar and Yahoo Finance. My current go-to is the Yahoo Finance app on my phone. I have set up my watch list for the individual stocks we own (TFSA in Canada,) as well as individual stocks in the Dow and TSX in our accounts dedicated to dividends, and our mutual funds (in our US IRAs.) I also use it to track USD vs CAD – which I watch very closely. Just waiting for the loonie to rebound!
    I have used Morningstar in the past to track our entire portfolio, but it wasn’t easy. I did like the x-ray feature, however. Perhaps Morningstar portfolio tracker has gotten better since I tried it last.

  • martin November 30, 2017, 10:32 am

    thanks a lot for this

    I was using TMX money which is a free option as well but i like Morningstar much better!

  • Jamie December 1, 2017, 8:22 am

    I’m planning to sign-up with Questrade. I know they have a watchlist feature. Is it not common to have this feature with-in a self direct account?

    Jamir

  • Matthew December 2, 2017, 11:58 am

    If you’re looking to roll your own Google Sheets has a GOOGLEFINANCE function which can retrieve a variety of fields – https://support.google.com/docs/answer/3093281?hl=en

    As a programmer I looked at writing something but wasn’t able to find free data sources.

  • Derek December 3, 2017, 1:56 pm

    I’ve always tracked my portfolio in a spreadsheet. I’d originally entered prices manually, then learned how to link to the Yahoo Finance API to bring prices in automatically. Then Yahoo shut that feature down at the beginning of November, so I was back to entering prices manually. Now Google has changed things so that I found it harder to get a quickly organized list of prices, so I have now started experimenting with the Alpha Vantage API to try to bring prices back in automatically into my Excel sheet. Changes suck, but at least I’m learning some new things about excel.

  • Jimmy @ CC Bank December 6, 2017, 12:24 pm

    I’ve actually been using Yahoo! Finance this whole time. Who would’ve ever thought it would outlive Google Finance? I’d even considered switching to Google at one point – guess it’s a good thing I didn’t.

  • WealthManager December 7, 2017, 2:12 pm

    I prefer Morningstar as it provides the time weighted total return for watch lists – one of my primary gripes with Google Finance. I use this to compare portfolios and individual stocks to various benchmarks.

    To get my money weighted return, I just use my brokerage’s capability – they have all the data and calculate automatically. Unfortunately, this is only provided at the portfolio level, thus if I wanted money weighted returns at the individual level, I would have to painstakingly enter all my transactions into Quicken, spreadsheets, Morningstar etc. For buy and hold positions, the time weighted returns provided by Morningstar are a sufficient enough proxy.

    I don’t like tedious entry of transactional data!

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