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2007 PF Blogger Net Worth Comparison

There are a lot of lists around the blogosphere that compare blogger monthly earnings, unique visits, pageviews and Alexa Rankings.  However, I haven't come across a list that compares the net worth of personal finance bloggers. MDJ is going to change that.

Not all PF Bloggers openly display there net worth which is understandable.  However, out of the ones who keep their finances transparent to the public, here are the Dec 2007 rankings by net worth and age.

Rank Blogger
Blog
Net Worth
Age
1 Millionaire Mommy Millionaire Mommy Next Door $1,617,988  43
2 MM PF Blog $875,850 31
3 Sun  The Sun's Financial Diary  $614,716  35
4 FrugalTrader Million Dollar Journey $272,900 28
5 Pinyo Moolonomy $236,400 33
6 Lazy Man Lazy Man and Money $214,826  31
Jonathan My Money Blog $204,759 29
8 Canadian Dream Canadian Dream: Free @ 45 $201,300  29
10 MG The Money Gardener $131000 28
11 Flexo Consumerism Commentary $121,861  31
12  Mr. Cheap Quest for Four Pillars $94,912 32
13  Financial Blogger The Financial Blogger $41,800 26

It's not that the net worth of a blogger means a lot, but it's interesting to see where they stand relative to others in the same blog space.  It's also a tricky comparison as a lot of people calculate their net worths differently. 

If you have a PF Blog that discloses your (positive) net worth, let me know and I'll add you to the list.

If you would like to read more articles like this, you can sign up for my free newsletter service below (we will not spam you).

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FrugalTrader About the author: FrugalTrader is the founder and editor of Million Dollar Journey (est. 2006). Through various financial strategies outlined on this site, he grew his net worth from $200,000 in 2006 to $1,000,000 by 2014. You can read more about him here.

{ 92 comments… add one }

  • FourPillars December 18, 2007, 12:25 am

    FB – I don’t really keep track of my net worth because it’s not an important figure to me. When I do calculate it I definitely count the house, both the value and mortgage.

    I do “use” some of my house value for leveraged investments.

    Mike

  • S. B. December 18, 2007, 2:56 am

    You will find my net worth on my site, but I only calculate and post it once a year.

    For those bloggers who post their net worth each month (which doesn’t include me), I believe there is a list of such that is updated each month over at the Enough Wealth blog.

  • Early Retirement Extreme December 19, 2007, 5:31 pm

    Nice idea with the table.

    I think that the “net worth = assets – liabilities” definition where assets includes the house and liabilities include the mortgage is sound. However, it is perhaps not terribly useful from a financial perspective. For instance a $100k net worth with $110k in assets and $10k in liabilities is much more impressive to me than the same with $800k in assets and $700k in liabilities. The latter was probably obtained by a lot of real estate speculators last year.

    I would be more inclined to use an equivalent of the quick ratio (acid test) which for personal finances would be = (total/taxable income – wage income) / expenses. If this ratio is above 1, then the person is financially independent. If the ratio is -1, the person is living paycheck to paycheck and if it is smaller, the person is going into debt.

    I would be interested in knowing people’s “quick ratios” rather than their net worth.

  • Millionaire Mommy Next Door December 20, 2007, 8:40 pm

    It’s fun to be #1 on this list!

    In the book, “The Millionaire Next Door” by Thomas J. Stanley and William D. Danko, there is an interesting calculation about real wealth. You can determine where you stand by entering your variables here:
    http://www.banksite.com/calc/wealth

    (Mine calculates to 3.7 times the desirable amount = Prodigious Accumulator of Wealth)

    Regarding including one’s personal residence into the net worth equation: If you read my blog, you know that in today’s irrational real estate market, I choose to rent rather than buy my home. Therefore, my net worth doesn’t include my home.

    In the strictest sense of the term “net worth”, one includes the current market value of their residence as an asset, then subtracts the mortgage(s) as a liability.

    BUT… unless you plan to sell your home some day (or borrow against it – perhaps with a reverse mortgage loan), you’ll eventually need to rent or downsize in order to use the equity asset. This alone makes home equity pretty useless in the wealth equation for many homeowners (IMO).

  • thickenmywallet December 20, 2007, 11:57 pm

    I do not agree that net worth is the “current market value” of a residence. Net worth on a residence is, in a pure accounting sense, the carrying costs/cost of acquisition minus any liability still remaining to acquire the asset.

    Net worth is not an expression of market value. Market value is what someone is willing to pay for an asset; not what you think its worth or what your neighbors got for a similar sized home.

    If you ever read a formal appraisal on real estate, it doesn’t state “net worth of property.” It states market value and not net worth.

    Does this lead to houses which have been owned for 25 years being grossly undervalued on a net worth basis? Most likely. But the market value will be a lot more. I think the terms have been muddled.

  • SingleGuyMoney December 22, 2007, 12:23 am

    I’d like to be included. I do a monthly networth post on my blog. Here’s the post for last month.

    http://www.singleguymoney.com/2007/12/november-net-worth-review.html

  • Llama Money December 23, 2007, 9:35 pm

    Though I’d certainly rank as the poorest on the list, I’d love to be put up next time you do an update. Here’s my last NW update:
    http://www.llamamoney.com/november-2007-net-worth/. I’d be in a distant last place but moving forward as best I can.

  • Dividends4Life December 24, 2007, 4:02 pm

    When I set my public goal, I considered net worth, but rejected it since much of my net worth is tied to employee stock options and my company’s stock. Depending on my company’s stock price, I have seen my net worth move +/- $50,000-$100,000 in a single day, none of which has anything to do with what I blog about.

    Best Wishes,
    D4L

  • Grace December 25, 2007, 1:31 am

    OK, make way for a gray lady. Your comparisons could use some diversity, so this 58 year old latesaver offers up quarterly net worth statements. My last one is here: http://gracefulretirement.blogspot.com/2007/09/quarterlymonthly-review.html but there will be a newer once sometime this week.

  • J.C.'s Money December 25, 2007, 8:06 am

    I disclose my networth in my blog here.

  • Amanda December 27, 2007, 2:06 am

    I am humbled by stars of the PF community :) One day I’ll make the list…

  • Anon December 28, 2007, 12:38 pm

    Millionaire Mommy still needs to explain how she became a millionaire with such meager income.

    http://millionairemommynextdoor.blogspot.com/2007/08/how-i-became-millionaire-while-working.html#c5809545040430215623

  • FrugalTrader December 28, 2007, 12:45 pm

    From my reading, Millionaire mommy started a small business, lived a frugal life, and invested their savings. Pretty simple formula. For more details, you’ll have to ask her yourself.

  • Anon December 28, 2007, 1:05 pm

    I am saying that the income itself is insufficient to accumulate one million dollars at a savings rate of 100%. There is some aspect to the story she has not shared, and I for one would like to hear it.

  • Millionaire Mommy Next Door December 28, 2007, 1:44 pm

    Anon, I have shared the details in my blog, although they are scattered throughout my posts and questions I’ve answered in my own comment sections. I’m not sure MDJ’s comment section (here) is the place for me to reiterate, so let me put together a detailed financial timeline and post it on my own blog soon.

    To summarize some of the main points:

    *I sold a couple of small businesses I had started (and invested the $)
    *We bought 2 bank-repossessed fixer-upper houses, lived in them while we made repairs, then sold them.
    *Built our last house, sold it, then rented a primary residence to live in so we could invest more $.
    *Earned approx. $30-40k/yr in our 20’s; $75-125k/yr in our 40’s.
    *Lived way below our means and invested our savings.
    *Invested without a broker, saving thousands in sales commissions.
    *My investment portfolio often outperformed the benchmarks.
    *Never wasted $ on interest and finance charges on credit cards.
    *Benefited from the astounding power of compounding.

    In other words, it wasn’t one big thing that made me wealthy – it was a combination of a lot of little things that add up. I hope this satisfies your curiosity a little until I have more time to piece together my timeline post.

  • Anon December 28, 2007, 5:33 pm

    Sounds more like a series of high-risk investments (starting small businesses [presumably with borrowed money], speculating in real estate [more borrowed money], and hand-picking stocks or funds) that happened to have a good outcome than a careful and prudent savings plan.

  • Enough Wealth March 5, 2008, 8:41 am

    Left me off the list ;)

    BTW – I’ve been doing a monthly post listing the NWs of many PF bloggers for over a year. Check it out if you want to see how some have progressed over time. I only include those that update their NWs each month though.

  • The Div Guy March 10, 2008, 3:30 pm

    I keep a monthly update of my networth on my site and would rank in the top ten. http://divguy.blogspot.com/

    I also track my stock performance on my site as well.

  • FinancialJungle March 25, 2008, 6:12 am

    It’s amazing how many people choose to exclude primary residence from their net worth because they don’t plan on selling. Since when is the decision to sell part of the definition of “net worth”?

    There are people who have held and never sold Johnson & Johnson, Royal Bank, Scotia Bank, Coca-Cola, GE, Fortis, BCE, Encana or Procter & Gamble until their dealth bed, but I doubt they ever excluded these investments from their net worth.

    Owning your home is like wearing two hats at once: tenant and landlord. You simply pay rents from one pocket and put the money into another. Not that different from owning dividend-paying stocks where you accept dividend cheques with one hand, and buy groceries with another.

    Great post, by the way, MDJ.

  • AJC @ 7million7years April 21, 2008, 1:27 am

    My Net Worth is posted on Networth IQ for all to see: http://www.networthiq.com/people/7million7years

    … goes to credibility for what I write about (wealth building).

  • JR April 21, 2008, 9:25 am

    “AJC said,

    My Net Worth is posted on Networth IQ for all to see:

    http://www.networthiq.com/people/7million7years

    http://7million7years.com/

    AJC, I could not find anywhere how you made $7 million in seven years

    What I saw on networth IQ was $0 to zillions from 2007 to now

    Would appreciate a quick run down on the holdings and investments that got you there, you know a kind on chronological timeline and the investments.

    Or simply link us to that page on your blog that shows it

    Thanks

  • AJC @ 7million7years April 21, 2008, 11:04 am

    Networth IQ is just a snapshop (current NetWorth); I will need to update it soon, as I since sold a property and closed another business transaction. But, the details aren’t important … only the principles: I went from $30k in Debt to $7million in just 7 years … my readers can, too.

    http://7million7years.com/about/

    Thanks,

    AJC.

  • JR April 21, 2008, 2:00 pm

    AJC said:
    “But, the details aren’t important … only the principles: I went from $30k in Debt to $7million in just 7 years … my readers can, too.”

    Sorry mate but the details are important, and the reason why is because you are a shining example of the MDJ.

    The approach or principles to an MDJ is one thing (each has their personal way of doing it that may not suit the next person), same as with the methods or tools that you used. What is really important is how YOU did it back then.

    Boast, brag, do whatever … come on AJC, give us the things that you did personally step by step (bit more details) that made you the multimillionaire you have become.

    A simple year on year, what you invested in, how you leveraged, when you bought & sold to increase your net worth, when you sold, tell us your MDJ on Frugals site. Maybe Frugal and others (me for one) can learn from aperson like yourself that has done the MDJ to the finish

    I read on your blog that you love to teach your approach and methods, so please, I beg you, reveal how you did it

  • AJC @ 7million7years April 22, 2008, 1:26 am

    If it were simple EVERYBODY would have 7m7y :)

    Actually, the principles are simple: I used the income from Business #1 (my first small business) to fund everything else: I reinvested the ‘dividends’ from my new businesses/investments into (a) expanding existing businesses into new locations (b) starting new businesses, and (c) acquiring property.

    Where others might increase spending as they became more successful, I controlled personal spending, created zero personal debt, and delayed gratification (bigger houses, cars, etc.) until it didn’t make sense NOT TO (no sense confusing being frugal with being a miser).

    When I reached my ‘Number’ ($10 Mill. = $250k p.a. passive income) plus a (rather large) margin for error – after all this money has to last 50 years – I sold some of the businesses and properties to ‘gear up’ to reinvest in more ‘passive’ assets, which is the phase that I am in now (hence, so much cash).

    If you think about it, these are the EXACT SAME STEPS that every PF blogger writes about (debt free, save, reinvest) … I just multiplied the scale and was VERY CLEAR on my cashout $ and time.

    I don’t believe that any PF writer has made their money BEFORE writing or has written about it in this context, which is why I write (no ads, no products sales, no book … maybe one day).

    … now that you know my ‘secret’, GO DO IT ;)

  • JR April 22, 2008, 8:29 am

    AJC: thanks for that, it said nothing.

    Paraphrase.

    I made some money, took that money and made more money, but dont ask the details because there isn’t any.

    For a guy with zero and $30k of debt, my guess your MDJ doesn’t exist, its all a make believ until you give us the details … now go get to ite

  • JR April 22, 2008, 8:30 am

    AJC: thanks for that, it said nothing.

    Paraphrase.

    I made some money, took that money and made more money, but dont ask the details because there isn’t any.

    For a guy with zero and $30k of debt, my guess your MDJ doesn’t exist, its all a make believe until you give us the details … now go get to it

    Show me

  • AJC @ 7million7years April 22, 2008, 3:36 pm

    Your reaction whilst rude, is entirely understandable … I have posted a large number.

    Let’s recap: FrugalTrader gave an invitation for bloggers to post their Net Worth on this page … he didn’t ask for details.

    But, if there is real interest from others in how I made it (I can’t imagine why, other than curiosity), either:

    1. Follow my blog – as relevant topics come up, I illustrate with equally relevant personal anecdotes, where appropriate, or

    2. I am happy to guest post on my 7MDJ here or any other respectable PF blog with a wide readership (I have a Contact Me form on my About page).

    Keep in mind that people who write PF blogs usually write in semi-anonymity and get to pick how much they choose to disclose … usually for good reasons that have nothing to do with blighting their personal integrity.

  • JR April 22, 2008, 6:37 pm

    AJC:

    Like you I am a guest on this blog, where you came to post your MDJ.

    It is not your blog (true) and as a guest of this blog whenever posters make remarks, make comments, boast or brags etc .. it is open to everyone to view and comment back, provide further input, even ask the odd question or two, if they desire to do so.

    To you I was simply requesting some details (for information & knowledge gathering) on what is was that you did in a high level, point-by-point (kind of a full bio) to get to your MDJ life story.

    I was shocked to get the response from someone as so rich, supposingly so talented, one that said they like passing the secret on to others, with remarks back …

    “if it were simple EVERYBODY would have 7m7y :) “, and
    “… now that you know my ’secret’, GO DO IT ;)”
    “Keep in mind that people who write PF blogs usually write in semi-anonymity and get to pick how much they choose to disclose … usually for good reasons that have nothing to do with blighting their personal integrity”

    BTW, you are correct on one point and that is Frugal did not ask for details, I did.

    Are you in the public eye, have you won the lottery, are you a fortune 500 person/company?

    ADJ, to me you are a secret. Are you so afraid of disclosing the details of your good fortune in the fear that others will get as rich as you say you are.

    Your blog : from zero to millions, beginning with $30k of debt

  • AJC @ 7million7years April 22, 2008, 9:13 pm

    FT,

    JR and I aren’t being very good guests … I apologize.

    BTW: my offer above stands if either you or another respectable blogger makes a request via my Contact Form on my About page. I’m not sure that it’s all that important, but the offer is there …

    AJC.

  • DAvid April 22, 2008, 10:05 pm

    There’s folk here in BC who have a similar meteoric rise in fortunes. They buy some seeds, plant their crop, harvest, dry and sell their herbs, retaining enough seeds to replant. To save costs, they use remote pieces of Crown land which has had the usable timber removed from it (kinda doing some value-added work to it, I guess), so they need not actually add the land costs to their expenditures. Since their product is so popular, they sometimes find another individual has stolen their crop. At other times, they arrive to find various government agencies harvesting it on their behalf.

    These entrepreneurs generally tend to be reluctant to discuss their fortunes in a public forum, though they may show considerable bravado in certain circles.

    :-)

    DAvid

  • JR April 22, 2008, 10:43 pm

    DAvid first. To plan, then carry out that plan, to fertilise, nurture and grow. then reap the harvest … simple, I have images of Revenue Canada or the IRS.

    AJC: we are fine guests here, thank you very much. All that needs to be remembered is what we learned in kindergarten or follow the steps of one of lifes philosophical teachers Dale Breckenridge Carnegie (read that somewhere). Life is simple for this old country boy, so is fortune building, as is lifes journey… one step at a time, as I rock back and forth in my chair (between that and the armchair) gazing and looking into space … thinking…..erm!

    I have taken the time over the past few days to read every single post on your blog AJC and there isn’t anywhere that I see posted that gives your MDJ

  • JR April 22, 2008, 11:14 pm

    AJC:

    In the event that you have not read it, the following is one of my favourite posts on this thread … it could be yours or belonging to any of us.

    I give you … tralahhhhhh

    “Millionaire Mommy Next Door

    I have shared the details in my blog, although they are scattered throughout my posts and questions I’ve answered in my own comment sections. I’m not sure MDJ’s comment section (here) is the place for me to reiterate, so let me put together a detailed financial timeline and post it on my own blog soon.

    To summarize some of the main points:

    *I sold a couple of small businesses I had started (and invested the $)
    *We bought 2 bank-repossessed fixer-upper houses, lived in them while we made repairs, then sold them.
    *Built our last house, sold it, then rented a primary residence to live in so we could invest more $.
    *Earned approx. $30-40k/yr in our 20’s; $75-125k/yr in our 40’s.
    *Lived way below our means and invested our savings.
    *Invested without a broker, saving thousands in sales commissions.
    *My investment portfolio often outperformed the benchmarks.
    *Never wasted $ on interest and finance charges on credit cards.
    *Benefited from the astounding power of compounding.

    In other words, it wasn’t one big thing that made me wealthy – it was a combination of a lot of little things that add up. I hope this satisfies your curiosity a little until I have more time to piece together my timeline post”

    It would appear the fortune is small compared to your own AJC, all the same it is an MDJ

  • AJC @ 7million7years April 23, 2008, 12:39 am

    OK then, I’ll do one for your blog …

  • AJC @ 7million7years April 26, 2008, 5:06 pm

    FT, I’ve done two things:

    1. I’ve posted my $7MDJ – there’s a tautology in there ;) – on my own site:

    http://7million7years.com/2008/04/25/my-7-million-dollar-journey/

    2. I’ve deleted my Net Worth from NetWorth IQ, so no longer ‘qualify’ for listing here :)

    I originally posted my Net Worth because my area of interest is blogging about building wealth, more so than saving/frugality … and, I wanted to show what IS possible.

    Now, by posting the first $7m7y journey on my own site, astute readers will (hopefully) see that it is all just common financial sense and is repeatable to a greater or lesser degree, by others.

    Proof: just see what Millionaire Mommy has already achieved … and how … not a great deal of of difference there.

    Thanks for opening the discussion! AJC.

  • JR April 27, 2008, 11:16 am

    Thanks

  • MoneySheep May 26, 2008, 1:21 am

    Net Worth get talks alot. Most people means Net Assets, it is Assets less Loans. But ultimately what most people want is Net Wealth, the ability to earn sustainable Cash Flow; not what they can sell their Assets for.

    You may have a high net worth by owning hugh assets (such as hugeh-mongus Rolex watch or a hugh house) that no body wants but you. But I would rather have a sustainable income (indexed to inflation) for the rest of my life.

  • Late night Geek October 6, 2008, 9:44 pm

    It takes time and a lot of dedication to become a millionaire

  • mei August 10, 2009, 9:12 pm

    Can’t state enough how important the sacrifices that go into wealth creation are.

    Curious if anyone has caught this book yet? “The Richest Man in Town” by W Randall Jones. I’ve read half of it so far and let me tell you it is well worth it. Would like to hear what everyone else thought of it?

    http://www.richestmanintown.com

  • Bill Bartmann September 3, 2009, 1:39 pm

    Excellent site, keep up the good work

  • SOPHIEry26 January 6, 2010, 10:26 am

    Buy essays or pre written essay and be insured you get all information about this good topic*.

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